Monday, April 30, 2012

Lets learn some Gallego!

Escrito por Fiorina Adorati
Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, España

Puede que no lo sepan por alla, pero en Galicia existe un idioma que convive con el castellano, lo cual hace que los estudiantes internacionales estemos muy confusos al principio, ya que no sabemos si nos hablan en castellano, o en gallego!
Hay algunas palabras en gallego que son muy importantes y que todos los que estudiamos aquí debemos conocer:
Morriña  -> Es una palabra gallega de tanta importancia que se ha extendido al español e incluso se usa en castellano: significa echar de menos tu tierra, tu casa, tu hogar, la familia y todo lo que esta en nuestra cabeza cuando pensamos en el lugar del que venimos. Es una palabra que nació cuando los gallegos tuvieron que emigrar buscando trabajo en América. La mayoría fueron a Argentina, de donde yo procedo, y, como había tantos gallegos, a los españoles en Argentina les llamamos “Gallegos”
Riquiño / Riquiña -> Significa lindo, de un modo muy dulce, en Galicia parece que todas las palabras son muy suaves y dulces, por eso las palabras gallegas para los españoles son muy tiernas y cuando alguien usa una palabra en gallego en otra parte de España le miran con los mismos ojitos que el gato de Shrek
Malo será -> No es una palabra, pero esta expresión demuestra el positivismo que todos los gallegos tienen, es una forma de despreocuparse, de, creer que las cosas saldrán bien. Significa “Seria raro que algo fuese mal”
Rapaz -> Niño, chico, es una palabra que se utiliza en castellano para los animales: “Ave Rapaz” instintivos e intuitivos, en gallego se le aplica a los niños, quizás porque también ellos son muy intuitivos.
“Vas caer” ->  Significa “te golpearas”, las abuelas las dicen a los niños cuando juegan por un sitio peligroso, cuando alguien hace algo que es evidente que no es correcto, o que va a causarle mal, dicen: “ainda vas caer” advirtiendo del peligro.

Estas son solo algunas de las expresiones y palabras gallegas que vamos aprendiendo con el tiempo y que se escucha a la gente de aca. Hay muchas más, así que seguiré aprendiendo!

My American Life


My American Life
by Xiaoxue Li
The first time I went to the Beijing International Airport and said “Bye-bye” to my parents, I knew it was the time to start a new life. I turned around, and my tears dropped quietly. I cried not only because I was leaving but because I was afraid. I was afraid of my new life. I was going to the U.S, which was a totally different country. Before I graduated from high school, I had never been to any other country, so this was a big challenge for me. There were a lot of thoughts that crossed my mind when I went through Chinese Customs. I thought about my parents and the happiest time I spent with them in my life, my grandparents and the delicious foods they cooked for me, and my best friend and all of these times we spent together. All of those thoughts came across my mind at once.
I was very upset during the first couple of weeks in the States, and I did not want to talk to anybody, even my roommate. I was always hiding in my dorm in Davis Hall, listening to sad songs and staring at my family photos. There was a photo that was taken during the spring at a farm where my parents and I went to visit my grandparents. In the picture, I was looking at the warm smile on my mom’s face; she was smiling about me and the kitten, which I had in my arms. My father and my grandpa were standing next to my mom; they were discussing how to build a new house for the youngest cat in my home. My grandma stood at the left corner of the photo; she looked at us, the people who stole her heart, quietly and peacefully. I looked at the photo like a puppet without a soul. I screamed in my heart that I wanted to go home. I talked with my family once a week and I always cried. My mom was extremely worried about me, and she tried so hard to persuade me to be happy, but being happy was just too hard for me.
However, things turned out to be better in the second month when I made my first group of friends. They were very friendly to me and helped me any time when I needed them. I talked with them and told them my vexations; they enlightened me and shared their sad experiences with me also. Once, one of my friends talked with me about her studying experience in Venezuela. She told me that as an international student there, she was totally controlled by the government in Venezuela; the government also tried to deprive the U.S. citizenship from her because her grandma was a Venezuelan. I was totally shocked by her story, and I started to think about my own “terrible” life; I asked myself if my life was really that bad. Later on, I got the answer from my heart, which was “No.” So I started to blend into my college life, and I really enjoyed it.
While with my friends, we did lots of fun things, like going to Dollywood. It was a warm Sunday, and we had a lot of fun on the way there. We played almost all of the games and rode all of the rides there. My favorite was the roller coaster because it made me think about my life. Those up-and-downs on the roller coaster were the same as all of the happy or sad moments in my life. So if I could enjoy the roller coaster, why could not I enjoy my life changing? I laughed all the way when we came back to campus from Dollywood, and my friends said they have never seen me this happy. Meanwhile, my mother noticed me changing. She knew that I was happier than I was when I first came. In addition, my English had improved a lot by having English conversations with my friends and classmates. I turned back to that happy girl again, just like when I was in China.

Last summer I went back to China and everyone who saw me said that I seemed different; I seemed more confident than before, and I was not that shy and timid girl anymore. I was more confident because I opened my view in the States, and I learned how to express my feelings and thoughts; these things were what I could not learn from colleges in China. From my life experience, I think people need to open their views and minds to replenish their lives. They also need to try more things to enhance themselves; for example, I got the ability to express myself from my international studying experiences. No seed can grow-up to become a big tree without any sun and rain; sometimes an opening view or a fighting heart can be the key to a meaningful life. Overall, I am really proud of coming to the States and starting a new life here; otherwise, I would just have been a normal college student in China and have learned nothing new from my life.

Sunday, April 29, 2012

My sister is coming to visit me!!!!

Escrito por Fiorina Adorati
Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, España

Mis padres y yo estuvimos planeando un viaje sorpresa para mi hermana Katherine  con motivo de su graduacion,. Despues de tanto tiempo ha llegado el dia en el que por fin le han  dicho la gran noticia! Estoy encantada y emocionada con la idea de volverla a ver! No la he visto por tanto tiempo...que no se como reaccionare cuando la tenga delante! Mi madre me había contado que le compro una valija nueva. Iba a envolverla con un lazo enorme y sobre ellos, los pasajes :) Me ha hecho tantísima ilusión recibir recién  un email que me acaba de escribir mi hermanita, “I AM COMING TO SPAIN FOR A WEEK OH MY GOD!!!!!!!! Fiorina!!! I can't believe I'm coming to see you for a week!!! This is insane!!! Aidjsnaicnsjcmankancjznahgdndkdj!!! I am so overly excited! I can't believe it!!!! Hahahahahahah ahhhhhhh!!” No se quien de las dos esta mas emocionada! Ahora, tengo que empezar a  planear su visita, preguntare a mis amigos santiagueses que puedo hacer con ella por aqui. Me gustaría llevarla a Portugal tambien, y mostrarle la cultura española, la gastronomia y como es mi vida aquí. Creo que le va a fascinar ver mi mundo por una semana.¡Acá te espero hermanita!

Saturday, April 28, 2012

EASTER BREAK PART 1

Elizabeth Hiatt
Johannes-Kepler Universitat Linz

Well I guess you could say that a new post is well overdue! I have had the busiest, craziest, most exciting couple weeks of my life! Late on Sunday night about two weeks ago I got back from my two week Easter Break from classes, and all I wanted to do was collapse into bed – I didn’t even finish unpacking.  For the vacation, first I spent a weekend in Vienna with two of my classmates (since we were flying out of the Vienna airport on Monday), and then I went to Hannover, Dublin, Amsterdam and Eindhoven, and finally Zilina and the mountains of Slovakia.  It was absolutely incredible, and I had the time of my life.

First stop:  Vienna.  Vienna is an absolutely incredible city, and it really wasn’t enough to stay there for just a weekend.  I’ll have to go back.  The first exciting aspect of the trip was that I got to ride a train for the first time! I was very happy – and I loved it!  One of the people I traveled with to get there was from Italy, and when I told him it was the first time I had ever been on a real train he looked at me like I was from another planet.  Then the other girl I was with, Sarah, and I had to explain that we don’t really have too many passenger trains in the States.  I honestly love all of the public transportation here.  When we got to Vienna we checked into our hostel, which was absolutely fabulous! It was clean, modern, and had great accommodation.  Sarah and I were in a private room with two other women: one was older and only spoke German, and the other was only a bit older than us and spoke English and German (and probably some other languages too).  As we talked to her, we found out she was from Germany and actually coming back from Slovakia.  She was getting her Masters in Cultural Anthropology, and she had just come from Slovakia where she was researching some minority groups that have settled there.

After that, we met up with Stefano again and we walked into the city center, which was quite a journey!  We went to the Stephansdom, or St. Stephen’s Cathedral, and it was truly a magnificent sight! After touring the inside a little and taking a tremendous amount of pictures, we went to the Sacher Hotel.  Stefano’s favorite torte of all time is Sacher Torte, and this was the place where the recipe was originally developed. We had to wait in line to get in to the place, but it was absolutely worth it because the torte was delicious.  Then, as Stefano was staying at a different hostel, we split up and did some shopping.  I had to be careful though – I would be flying with Ryanair and I can only have one bag (I didn’t want to go to the trouble of checking anything), so I had to choose my souvenirs carefully.  Mostly I got postcards to send to people, as those travel really well.  When we got back that night we got to talk to our roommate again, and we found out that the next morning she would be going to a local church to see the Vienna Boy’s Choir! Even though we would have to get there super early we decided to tag along, because how many times do you get an opportunity to do something like that?

We both slept like the dead that night and got up early to go to the church the next morning.  It was freezing, and it actually started to snow a little bit! After going past the church and getting a little bit turned around we found it and went inside.  We sat upstairs and didn’t actually have a good view of the choir or the mass, but we were provided with little TVs to see the whole scene.  The mass was mostly in German, of course, so I only understood a very little bit, but I really enjoyed listening to the choir.  After that we had to say goodbye to our roommate, who was leaving to go home, but I’m so glad we got to meet her.  We had to stop back by the hostel, but then we went to see Schönbrunn Palace, property that belonged to the Habsburgs! It was constructed in an absolutely astounding Baroque style, and was very fascinating to tour.  We saw the inside of the palace and then went out to explore the beautiful gardens that were on the property.  Again, lots of pictures were taken!  We ended up staying there for about a total of five hours or so, tour included and all, so by the time we got back to the hostel all we could do was collapse until dinner.  I had an early flight to Hannover, so I had to go to bed as soon as I could.  Even though I was a little sad to leave Vienna, I was extremely excited because I was going to visit Madison!

Welcome to Lagos, Portugal!

Escrito por Fiorina Adorati
Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, España

Preparasen para divertirse, semana santa en España es como Spring Break en los estados. Los estudiantes tienen una semana para descansar y disfrutar. Mis amigas, Aina y Meghan, y yo decidimos ir a Lagos, Portugal. Creo, que ya les he comentado sobre el lugar que decidimos ir pero no les contente que hicimos. Se me olvido de hacer un blog para contarles sobre la experiencia. Por empezar, tomamos el autobús por 13 horas porque era muy barato. Pero fue la verdad un horror porque estar en un autobús sentados por horas a tras horas fue algo insoportable ya que me aburrí y me dolía la espalda tremendamente. Además, no es que tomamos un autobús pero si no tuvimos que hacer 4 cambios.
En la cual, hasta hoy no puedo creer que no perdimos una conexión. Bueno, el paisaje fue lindo aunque llovió la mayoría del tiempo. Cuando llegamos, corrimos a nuestro apartamento porque estábamos contentísimas de haber llegado finalmente y de salir del autobús. Como pueden ver en las fotos, el apartamento era encantador. Era chiquito pero muy cómodo, practico y nada más 10 minutes de la playa caminando. El primer día allí llovió sin parar; entonces, nos dedicamos en descansar y hacer las compras. Nos fuimos al mercado pero por supuesto casi nos compramos todo el supermercado. Yo me encargue de cocinar toda la semana y mis compañeras tomaban turno para lavar los platos. Por alguna razón, les he agarrado mucho cariño a la cocina en general. Me encanta ahora cocinar, es como que me calma y destreza. Creo que a mi madre le va a gustar este cambio porque antes no me gustaba cocinar. También, creo que he mejorado bastante. Bueno, me han dicho jajaja. Pero me da un poco de lástima porque me he acostumbrado de cocinar cosas que mi amiga, Meghan, le gusta como comidas muy simples; por ejemplo, espagueti y etc. Porque a ella no le gusta comidas raras como pulpo o chorizo, pero a mí me fascina.
Bueno, sigo con el viaje. Las playas eran espectaculares pero el mar estaba helado, por supuesto y el horrible clima no ayudaba para nada. Pero no los paro de meternos al mar, porque cuando podes decir que estuviste nadando en Portugal. Nos helamos pero estábamos determinadas en nadar en ella. El pueblo era chiquito, parecía, con miles de turistas; era normal escuchar personas hablando ingles, no solo el británico pero igual de los estados. La mayoría de la gente eran jóvenes o familias con pequeñitos. Bueno, tengo que confesar que me enamore de unos pastelitos llamados “nata,” que tiene adentro crema pastelera. Me compraba como 4 al día, una cosa ridícula. Llovió muchísimo mientras estábamos ahí pero estábamos determinadas de disfrutar de nuestras vacaciones.
Decidimos ir al zoológico de Lagos, fue un suceso. Actuamos como niñas chiquititas allá, corríamos de un lado al otro como si nunca hubiéramos ido a un zoológico antes. Asimismo, imitábamos las estatuas y sacábamos fotos haciéndolo (lo pueden ver en la mayoría de las fotos). ¡Me encanto! Vimos diferente animales pero había más pájaros que cualquier otro animal. Me llamo la atención, que no había elefantes, jirafas o leones. Era un zoológico pequeño pero encantador. Había un pavo real (peacock) suelto que paseaba por todo el zoológico como un niño visitándolo. Una vez cuando me di vuelta, el pavo real estaba justo al lado mío y pegue un grito como si hubiera visto una serpiente. ¡Fue gracioso!
Bueno, finalmente el clima se despejo el día antes que nos tuviéramos que marchar a Santiago. Nos pusimos contentísimas por el lindo día; entonces, nos marchamos a la playas famosas de la zona que habíamos escuchado que eran bellísimas. Nos pusimos las mallas, fuimos al supermercado y nos fuimos por fin a las playas. No les puedo decir cómo me sentí cuando llegamos. Nunca en mi vida había visto unas playas tan bellas con aguas tan cristales, parecía casi de mentira. Tiene que ver las fotos para que vean lo que me estoy refiriendo. Para concluir, Lagos fue un lugar bellísimo para visitar con hermosas playas y amable gente. Tengo que admitir de vuelta que los portuguéss son mucho más atentos que los españoles de Santiago. Les he contado esto anteriormente en las aéreas que he visitado anteriormente en Portugal. Pero ahora pudo asegurarles que si lo son; especialmente que he cubierto la mayoría parte de Portugal. Bueno, tuvimos que volver en autobús de vuelta. Fue una tortura pero estaba tan contenta de volver a Santiago. Aunque el clima no estaba en su buen estado durante nuestra vacación, aun nos divertimos. Espero que les gusten las fotos. ¡Chau! 





























Easter Break Part 1


Well I guess you could say that a new post is well overdue! I have had the busiest, craziest, most exciting couple weeks of my life! Late on Sunday night about two weeks ago I got back from my two week Easter Break from classes, and all I wanted to do was collapse into bed – I didn’t even finish unpacking.  For the vacation, first I spent a weekend in Vienna with two of my classmates (since we were flying out of the Vienna airport on Monday), and then I went to Hannover, Dublin, Amsterdam and Eindhoven, and finally Zilina and the mountains of Slovakia.  It was absolutely incredible, and I had the time of my life.

First stop:  Vienna.  Vienna is an absolutely incredible city, and it really wasn’t enough to stay there for just a weekend.  I’ll have to go back.  The first exciting aspect of the trip was that I got to ride a train for the first time! I was very happy – and I loved it!  One of the people I traveled with to get there was from Italy, and when I told him it was the first time I had ever been on a real train he looked at me like I was from another planet.  Then the other girl I was with, Sarah, and I had to explain that we don’t really have too many passenger trains in the States.  I honestly love all of the public transportation here.  When we got to Vienna we checked into our hostel, which was absolutely fabulous! It was clean, modern, and had great accommodation.  Sarah and I were in a private room with two other women: one was older and only spoke German, and the other was only a bit older than us and spoke English and German (and probably some other languages too).  As we talked to her, we found out she was from Germany and actually coming back from Slovakia.  She was getting her Masters in Cultural Anthropology, and she had just come from Slovakia where she was researching some minority groups that have settled there.

After that, we met up with Stefano again and we walked into the city center, which was quite a journey!  We went to the Stephansdom, or St. Stephen’s Cathedral, and it was truly a magnificent sight! After touring the inside a little and taking a tremendous amount of pictures, we went to the Sacher Hotel.  Stefano’s favorite torte of all time is Sacher Torte, and this was the place where the recipe was originally developed. We had to wait in line to get in to the place, but it was absolutely worth it because the torte was delicious.  Then, as Stefano was staying at a different hostel, we split up and did some shopping.  I had to be careful though – I would be flying with Ryanair and I can only have one bag (I didn’t want to go to the trouble of checking anything), so I had to choose my souvenirs carefully.  Mostly I got postcards to send to people, as those travel really well.  When we got back that night we got to talk to our roommate again, and we found out that the next morning she would be going to a local church to see the Vienna Boy’s Choir! Even though we would have to get there super early we decided to tag along, because how many times do you get an opportunity to do something like that?

We both slept like the dead that night and got up early to go to the church the next morning.  It was freezing, and it actually started to snow a little bit! After going past the church and getting a little bit turned around we found it and went inside.  We sat upstairs and didn’t actually have a good view of the choir or the mass, but we were provided with little TVs to see the whole scene.  The mass was mostly in German, of course, so I only understood a very little bit, but I really enjoyed listening to the choir.  After that we had to say goodbye to our roommate, who was leaving to go home, but I’m so glad we got to meet her.  We had to stop back by the hostel, but then we went to see Schönbrunn Palace, property that belonged to the Habsburgs! It was constructed in an absolutely astounding Baroque style, and was very fascinating to tour.  We saw the inside of the palace and then went out to explore the beautiful gardens that were on the property.  Again, lots of pictures were taken!  We ended up staying there for about a total of five hours or so, tour included and all, so by the time we got back to the hostel all we could do was collapse until dinner.  I had an early flight to Hannover, so I had to go to bed as soon as I could.  Even though I was a little sad to leave Vienna, I was extremely excited because I was going to visit Madison!

To keep things short, I’ll split up my vacation into a couple posts.  Next:  Hannove

Friday, April 27, 2012

TO THE AMERICAN IN GERMANY

Madison Elkins
Leibniz Universitat Hannover

                                        Things You Will Miss that You Never Thought You’d Miss 

1.  Your cat.  You have no idea how much you will miss your cat.
2.  Publicly accessible drink machines.  You never realize how blissful that sprite-on-the-go can be until you aren’t allowed to have it.  In public places your eyes will always seek the fluorescent back-lit image of a sweating coke bottle that cries, “Refresh yourself!” Your ears will forever strain to hear the gentle hum of refrigeration that whispers, “Oasisss.” Let’s imagine that you have been running errands all day.  You are parched.  You’ve probably never been this thirsty in your life.  You think maybe no one has ever been this thirsty. Your tongue is crying dry little tears of sand.  So you decide to find a drink.

Let’s weigh your options.
  • You can stop in a restaurant to “purchase” (aka “donate left arm”) a drink. In a cute little glass.  Let’s call her Half-Pint.
  • You can stop in a market to buy a water/juice/soda the size (literally) of your lower leg. I’m talking anklecalfknee. The same proportions of a newborn babe. This is sold at a reasonable price.  But you must carry this bottle (until you finish it, which, I’m telling you now, will be next week) in addition to the purse and books you are also carrying, through trains, shops and crowds of people.  When you aren’t whacking these people in the hip with your anklecalfknee newborn babe, whispering “Entshuldigung” like a fervent prayer, you’ll be dropping it in front of tiny old German ladies whose walkers and temperaments are simply not constructed to withstand that kind of shock.  And then, entshuldigung (all-purpose German for “excuse me”) just doesn’t cut it.
  • You can cry. Drink your tears. Repeat.
  • You can find a bathroom, where you will sip tap water from the sink.  But given the fact that public bathrooms are also lacking, you’ll either have to go to a restaurant (and buy something), or to a major train station, where you will be charged 1.50 to 2 euros for entrance into The Loo.  So you might as well buy a Half-Pint Sprite at McDonalds. For about the same price.
  • You can die of dehydration. If at any time you think you’re going crazy, be comforted by the fact that you are correct.
  • You can go home, where there is a faucet and a mug and a refrigerator.  There, you will manufacture your very own chilled tap water. Huzzah.
The last is the least unfavorable, because you will (probably, at some point) go home.  And if Indiana Jones can go without an ice cold bottled water for three days, you can do it too.  For three hours. But wouldn’t it be nice to see just one coke machine peeping around the corner, waving hello?

3. Publicly accessible bathrooms that don’t require a $2 donation or a meal or a tearful supplication.
4. Baking soda. You will try to find it.  You will be convinced that it is around here somewhere, that it is simply eluding you, that you don’t have its correct German name, that you aren’t looking in the right places.  Stop blaming yourself, and repeat after me.  Germans. Do not use. Arm and Hammer.  They use something else entirely, and it isn’t worth scouring the city for it. (but it is worth making puns about.)
5. Krispy Kreme Donuts.  You knew all along there was no alternative, you just didn’t want to face it.  This is a time for moral support and listless consumer choices meant to fill that donut-shaped hole in your heart. (They won’t, but you can try.) I suggest the chocolate-covered coconut marshmallow fluffs. The pink ones. I like to call them bon bons.
6. Your car.  Nothing says, “I CAN!” like a Honda Accord. Nothing says, “I CAN’T!” like public transportation workers on strike.
7. Quality canned soup.  At least, canned soup that you know from years of consumer experience to be good quality.  You may have a very clear internalized hierarchy of American brand names, you may speak and understand the language of logo design (nothing says crappy like comic sans), but all that amounts to jack squat when you’re operating on foreign soil. Perhaps Germany possesses the most delectable canned soups of all the world.  But I wouldn’t know; they all look the same, and one looks as chintzy or as exotic as the next.  It will take you 20 more years to establish another liquid lexicon.  In the meantime, you must either do without, or purchase at will.  Just select the one that sounds the best when you slosh it around a bit.
Picture

To The American In Germany

by Madison Elkins
 

Things You Will Miss that You Never Thought You’d Miss
1.  Your cat.  You have no idea how much you will miss your cat.
2.  Publicly accessible drink machines.  You never realize how blissful that sprite-on-the-go can be until you aren’t allowed to have it.  In public places your eyes will always seek the fluorescent back-lit image of a sweating coke bottle that cries, “Refresh yourself!” Your ears will forever strain to hear the gentle hum of refrigeration that whispers, “Oasisss.” Let’s imagine that you have been running errands all day.  You are parched.  You’ve probably never been this thirsty in your life.  You think maybe no one has ever been this thirsty. Your tongue is crying dry little tears of sand.  So you decide to find a drink.
Let’s weigh your options.
  • You can stop in a restaurant to “purchase” (aka “donate left arm”) a drink. In a cute little glass.  Let’s call her Half-Pint.
  • You can stop in a market to buy a water/juice/soda the size (literally) of your lower leg. I’m talking anklecalfknee. The same proportions of a newborn babe. This is sold at a reasonable price.  But you must carry this bottle (until you finish it, which, I’m telling you now, will be next week) in addition to the purse and books you are also carrying, through trains, shops and crowds of people.  When you aren’t whacking these people in the hip with your anklecalfknee newborn babe, whispering “Entshuldigung” like a fervent prayer, you’ll be dropping it in front of tiny old German ladies whose walkers and temperaments are simply not constructed to withstand that kind of shock.  And then, entshuldigung (all-purpose German for “excuse me”) just doesn’t cut it.
  • You can cry. Drink your tears. Repeat.
  • You can find a bathroom, where you will sip tap water from the sink.  But given the fact that public bathrooms are also lacking, you’ll either have to go to a restaurant (and buy something), or to a major train station, where you will be charged 1.50 to 2 euros for entrance into The Loo.  So you might as well buy a Half-Pint Sprite at McDonalds. For about the same price.
  • You can die of dehydration. If at any time you think you’re going crazy, be comforted by the fact that you are correct.
  • You can go home, where there is a faucet and a mug and a refrigerator.  There, you will manufacture your very own chilled tap water. Huzzah.
The last is the least unfavorable, because you will (probably, at some point) go home.  And if Indiana Jones can go without an ice cold bottled water for three days, you can do it too.  For three hours. But wouldn’t it be nice to see just one coke machine peeping around the corner, waving hello?
3. Publicly accessible bathrooms that don’t require a $2 donation or a meal or a tearful supplication.
4. Baking soda. You will try to find it.  You will be convinced that it is around here somewhere, that it is simply eluding you, that you don’t have its correct German name, that you aren’t looking in the right places.  Stop blaming yourself, and repeat after me.  Germans. Do not use. Arm and Hammer.  They use something else entirely, and it isn’t worth scouring the city for it. (but it is worth making puns about.)
5. Krispy Kreme Donuts.  You knew all along there was no alternative, you just didn’t want to face it.  This is a time for moral support and listless consumer choices meant to fill that donut-shaped hole in your heart. (They won’t, but you can try.) I suggest the chocolate-covered coconut marshmallow fluffs. The pink ones. I like to call them bon bons.
6. Your car.  Nothing says, “I CAN!” like a Honda Accord. Nothing says, “I CAN’T!” like public transportation workers on strike.
7. Quality canned soup.  At least, canned soup that you know from years of consumer experience to be good quality.  You may have a very clear internalized hierarchy of American brand names, you may speak and understand the language of logo design (nothing says crappy like comic sans), but all that amounts to jack squat when you’re operating on foreign soil. Perhaps Germany possesses the most delectable canned soups of all the world.  But I wouldn’t know; they all look the same, and one looks as chintzy or as exotic as the next.  It will take you 20 more years to establish another liquid lexicon.  In the meantime, you must either do without, or purchase at will.  Just select the one that sounds the best when you slosh it around a bit.

Wednesday, April 25, 2012 Things I have grown to like and dislike

by Amy Hagerman
Universidad de Murcia, Spain

Voy a escribir este blog solamente porque.. pues es posible que no quiero hacer mis otras tareas :)  Pero sin dudas es un blog de mi tiempo y adaptación de mi semestre en espana. Tengo 3 mas semanas, o 24 días o 3 exámenes (como quiere decirlo) hasta que me vaya a los EEUU y he estado pensando en las cosas de mi vida cotidiana aquí. El primero grupo es los positivos y el segundo es los negativos que no voy a tener emociones de triste cuando salir...


1. El sol, la temperatura (elige el sur de España por un razón ;)
2. mi apartamiento
3. la posibilidad de viajar muy fácilmente y muy barato
4. el visto del atardecer de mi cocina (:mira las fotos:)
5. mis amigos
6. el precio de comida buena porque es muy barato
7. el precio de alcohol, ropa, transporte.. también porque todo es mas barato aqui para mi
8. que estoy estudiando arte, musica, literatura y mas de la cultura espanola en Espana!
9. la siesta
10. no tener mucha tarea
11. que hay basuras diferentes por la basura diferente (el reciclaje). Hay un recipiente verde por vidrio, amarillo por basura, moreno por papel etc.
12. arquitectura anciano

--------
1. la gente es critico de mi ropa o cara o pelo,  yo no se cual pero en murcia siempre mírame desde mi cabeza a mis pies y hace una cara de disgusto.. no me gusta nada esto
2. los estilos de pelo (dreds, mullets esta de moda en europea y también con las chicas?!)

3. no hay restaurantes o tiendas abiertos con comida después 11 de la noche (echo de menos comida caliente sin usar mi cocina en la noche. Piensa taco bell o Ihop jaja)
4. la gente que no usa desodorante

Es todo por ahora. Estaba pensando de esto en mi clase hoy y quiero ver esto cuando regresar a los estados unidos y recordar :)

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Study Abroad Slideshow, Spain 2012

By Fiorina Adorati
Santiago de Compostela, Spain 


If the elevator is not awkward enough!


Escrito por Fiorina Adorati
Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, España

Lección del día, no es nada especial pero me gustaría contarles. Comienzo, camino muchísimo en Santiago ya que la cuidad no me parece tan grande y tomar el autobús lleva más tiempo que caminar. Además, es completamente estresante tomar el autobús. Por ejemplo, una vez el autobús estaba justo al frente mío, pero como no tenía el numero C1 no me subí. Entonces, mire a la pantalla devuelta y cambio de autobús C1 a un minuto para 25 minutos. Ya que camino tanto, es muy normal que tome el elevador. Y tengo que decirles que también lo hago si es solo un piso. ¡A veces puedo ser ridícula! He notado en varias ocasiones, que cuando una persona entra al elevador nadie se mueve al lado. Pero yo si lo hago, es como que no quieren que alguien se suba. También, es totalmente necesario decir “chau” cuando te bajas del elevador pero no siempre dicen  “hola” cuando entran al elevador. Entonces, me confundo si tengo que decir “hola” pero siempre digo “chau.” Y aunque no conozca la persona en el elevador, es necesario decir “chau.” La verdad que el elevador es un asunto inconfortable y raro porque hay veces que una persona se pone súperamente cerca de mí y pienso que es mala educación si me hago al lado. Me ha pasado una vez acá en el los elevadores del dormitorio. Bueno, me voy a dormir. Próximamente, estoy trabajando en un blog sobre Semana Santa. ¡Besos!

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Who is ready for some Pulpo Gallego?

Escrito por Fiorina Adorati
Universidad de Santiago, España

Me han preguntado anteriormente en Skype cuales eran unas comidas típicas de la zona, les he comentado sobe la tortilla de papas. Pero se me olvido completamente de contarles sobre el pulpo gallego. Hay muchas personas que no pensarían probar comidas distintivas del área, pero probar comidas diferentes o raras es mi especialidad,  a mi me fascina probar nuevas comidas. Bueno, por lo menos una vez. Vale, en Santiago de Compostela se destaca por el pulpo gallego plato. Yo he tenido pulpo anteriormente pero no recuerdo que fue pulpo grande como de estas zonas, pero pulpitos pequeñitos. Me han contado que es un proceso que lleva su buen tiempo y paciencia. Primero es necesario ablandar el pulpo (¿supongo que deber ser bastante duro?). Lo tienen que congelar por unos días anteriormente a cocinar y después lo ponen en una olla grande para hervirlo hasta “ que rompa a hervir añadimos el pulpo. Lo cogemos por la cabeza y lo metemos y sacamos de la cazuela tres veces antes de soltarlo definitivamente. Lo dejamos al fuego unos cincuenta minutos.” Finalmente, cuando ya esta cocido se saca del fuego y se deja por cuatro horas en reposo. Luego, con el caldo adonde el pulpo fue cocinado se hierve cebollas y papas. Y finalmente, se corta el pulpo con tijeras como si fuera un papel. Luego le ponen especies como pimentón dulce o picante, aceite de Olivia y sal. Mi amiga y yo estamos determinadas que vamos a probar esta delicadeza. Les voy a contar después como me fue. También, me conto mi amigo gallego, Dani, que acá también se come oreja de cerdo. Me comento que él nunca lo ha probado porque le da asco pero a mí me gustaría probar antes que me valla. Pero no sé si lo voy a poder hacer ya que te la sirven una oreja en un plato, es poco extraño. No es que la cortan o la decoran para que sea más apetitivo. ¡Bueno hasta la próxima! 


Continuation of Barcelona Weekend…

Escrito por Fiorina Adorati
Universidad de Santiago, España

¡Hola! Ya sé que he hecho un blog anteriormente sobre Barcelona pero he encontrado unas fotos que mi amiga tenía en su camera y es necesario mostrarlas. ¡Besos!















Rain = Santiago de Compostela

Escrito por Fiorina Adorati
Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, España

Cuando estaba en Maryville decidiendo a donde me gustaría ir a estudiar, el año pasado. Ya había eliminados varias universidades y me quedaba solo dos universidades: Santiago y Madrid. La primera vez que conocí Miguel, el estudiante de Santiago que está estudiando en Maryville actualmente, le pregunte qué pensó de Santiago. Me comento que lluvia muchísimo y cuando le pregunte a su amigo por correo electrónico me dijo lo mismo. Bueno, yo pensé que un poco de lluvia es tolerante. Cuando llegue a Santiago casi tres meses atrás, llovía una vez cada tanto. Entonces, pensé que estaban exagerando, pero tengo que admitir ahora ya que ha llovido SIN parar por casi dos semanas, tenían mucha razón. Es totalmente imposible de tener el pelo bien hecho o estar bella cuando cada vez que caminos en las calles es normal de meter un pie en un charco. Por ejemplo, hoy una amiga y yo decidimos vestirnos bien con vestidos; ya que a los españoles les encanta vestirse bien. Pero qué mala idea, cuando salimos de la clase de musica y caminábamos hacia nuestro dormitorio, se largó a llover y por supuesto no teníamos paraguayas. Ya que por la mañana el cielo estaba despejado y el sol nos estaba dejando siega. Fue una situación súperamente ridícula. Todo el mundo nos miraba como si fuéramos marcianas, ya que estábamos vestidas como si fuera verano y bajo la temperatura tremendamente en unas horas. Bueno, es totalmente normal que los españoles nos miren… Es la cultura de ellos, de mirar a las personas mal. Seguimos, esta no ha sido la primera vez que ha pasado esto, el clima de Santiago tiene su propio loco carácter. Además, por las noches casi siempre hay una lluvia muy finita que casi no se ve. Tengo que admitir, que solo en Santiago la lluvia puede llegar ser bella. Las calles y paisajes de la parte vieja son totalmente mucho más encantadores con la lluvia. El piso mojado refleja las antiguas casas. Y los paraguayas de diferentes colores y tamaños llenan las pequeñas calles con colores. Tengo que confesar que le he agarrado mucho cariño a Santiago, siento como que finalmente puedo decir que estoy en casa. 

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